Fuel to the fire: Samsung certified its own batteries

It is an uncommon practice in the industry of mobile devices…

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A new black page opens in the story of one of the largest consumer technology companies in the world. While we still don’t know what causes technical problems on one of its flagship terminals, the Note 7, which recently had to be removed to prevent further cases of fires among its owners, the South Korean giant, Samsung was responsible for certifying the safety of their own batteries, an uncommon practice in the industry.

Safety assurance made on the batteries used in mobile devices came from their own research laboratories and its headquarters, according to “The Wall Street Journal.” Typically, manufacturers of such electronic devices need approval from any of the 28 laboratories certified by the CTIA, the organisation responsible for examining those related to mobile telephones and other products.

The tests must ensure due to compliance of the standards established by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers to market their products in the US. However, Samsung is the only manufacturer that uses its own facilities to carry out this verification. This situation has highlighted the suspicion about a possible failure in safety during the manufacturing process of the batteries.

Samsung has said, meanwhile, that tests internally revealed no problems in the Galaxy Note 7, which had to be withdrawn from the markets where it was made available (including the UK) for registering cases of ignition. Apple, Huawei, Lenovo and Nokia are some firms that have safety certificates issued by CTIA. After this event, which can generate losses of 10,000 million to the company, Samsung recently said they will make “significant changes” to ensure the quality of their products.

While the problems are clarified, the Government of South Korea has begun its own investigation to find the causes of ignitions on Note 7’s. The Korea Testing Laboratory (KTL, of ALARA), a state agency, is working with five devices affected in China provided by Samsung Electronics on Thursday, they said industry sources to Yonhap news agency.

For now, and to avoid further problems, Samsung has announced it will offer replacement phones to users of said terminal with international flights from South Korea, after the US and other countries banned the device in aircraft. “We have opened a counter at Incheon International Airport so that users can change their Note 7 for a terminal of another model”, told Efe a spokesman for the company based in Seoul, without specifying whether this measure will be extended to airports In other countries.